Haste usually leads to poor outcomes

ANOTHER OPINION

Haste usually leads to poor outcomes

Mark F. Fisher lives in Mount Dora.

The position of superintendent, whether it’s a new hire or the renewal of an existing contract, is too important to be handled rashly and in haste.

This was a mistake and should be remedied by the board at its next meeting.

Haste in decision making usually leads to poor outcomes.

Often the necessity of swiftness is a self-inflicted wound.

The passage of the funding measure by the U.S. Congress was a prime example of where the foot-dragging of the Senate on appropriations measures passed by the House caused the House and the Senate to struggle with a 1,603-page bill in order to prevent the government from closing down non-essential functions.

The efficacy of the so called “Cromnibus” bill and the politics and wisdom of that measure could fill a small book and is beyond the scope of this commentary.

FY2015 Funding Bill

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/house-narrowly-passes-fy2015-funding-bill-two-day-cr

But it is a good example of where government acting in great haste has left itself and American citizens dissatisfied and justifiably angry at how business is conducted.

But rashness is not confined to the hallowed halls of Congress; it is found in our own back yard as well.

Arguably, the decision by the Lake County Commission to impose an enormous 14 percent tax increase on real estate was done rashly.

Initially proposed as a 19 percent increase, it appeared without warning

(and after briefings that had suggested no increase would be contemplated).

But even then we had multiple public hearings as well as several privately organized meetings where responsible public officials appeared to be grilled and challenged on the necessity of the action.

In contrast to that rashness, we find that the Lake County School Board inexplicably rushed to extend a two-year contract to Superintendent Susan Moxley to the tune of $156,750 per annum plus juicy incentives that could boost that by $17,000 (or nearly 11 percent).

This only days after Board Member Bill Mathias sought authority to initiate negotiations.

Setting aside for the moment the appropriateness of any contract extension or award relating to her performance and there is quite an amount to discuss on that, given the Board was entertaining thoughts of firing her not six months ago, it’s the suddenness and limited amount of public input that is of immediate concern.

This is the flip side of the self-inflicted wound that Congress is guilty of.

This is an example of where haste is employed unnecessarily.

Moxley’s present contract has many months left on it, and as far as is publicly known she was not threatening to leave for some other post.

So why the rush?

And why was it done in the midst of the holiday season, when many are distracted from the public goings on by the burdens of family gatherings, travel and religious observances?

The decision to retain and extend Moxley’s contact was not some ministerial act requiring only cursory examination and approval.

No.

To the contrary.

There have been significant events under her watch that warrant examination, disclosure and discussion amongst the public.

Her position is atop the largest public employer in Lake County.

Her job performance impacts every stakeholder in the county, every property owner, every parent and every employer.

The position of superintendent, whether it’s a new hire or the renewal of an existing contract, is too important to be handled rashly and in haste.

This was a mistake and should be remedied by the board at its next meeting.

Mark F. Fisher lives in Mount Dora.

http://www.dailycommercial.com/

DUH

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